CONSERVATION PROJECTS














 

THE RSPB BECKINGHAM MARSHES
NATURE RESERVE PLANT ALPHABET

An alphabet created to stimulate interest in the RSPB Beckingham Marshes Nature Reserve. In 2014 and 2015 Amanda was one of six artists who took part in a series of exhibitions inspired by the recent restoration and conservation of the reserve. With help from the Heritage Lottery Fund, the RSPB restored this part of the River Trent floodplain to marshland and created a new nature reserve of wetland habitats in which many species of marsh plants, birds and animals have re-established themselves. The funding was also used to initiate events involving local communities. In addition to the artists' endeavours, a group of local writers, actors, musicians and set designers produced and staged a play telling the history of the marshes and a celebratory Marsh Fayre was held.
Click here for more!

Left and right: R is for Ranunculus acris
and D is for Dactylis glomerata
by Amanda Willoughby (Copyright 2014)




RARE AND ENDANGERED CORNFIELD FLOWERS
AT RYEDALE FOLK MUSEUM
"Swathes of golden corn speckled with the rainbow colours of a multitude of wild flowers were once a common sight in the British countryside, but by the late 20th century these delightful scenes were no more."
- Amanda Willoughby, January 2002

Rare and Endangered Cornfield Flowers is a visual record of plants on the verge of extinction due to post-war intensive farming methods. It consists of eight illustrated interpretation panels, which were created to raise awareness of the Cornfield Flower Conservation Programme at Ryedale Folk Museum. In partnership with The North York Moors National Park Authority and the Carstairs Trust, the museum began a programme to rescue rare and endangered cornfield flowers from extinction and to encourage more cornfield flower conservation programmes to be established nationwide.

The aim of Amanda's interpretation panels was to draw attention to the beauty of cornfield flowers, to highlight the tragedy and impact of their loss in the British countryside and to stress the importance of their conservation.

The work was awarded a Royal Horticultural Society Gold Medal at the RHS London Flower Show in 2002.


.


Left: Red Hemp Nettle, Cornflower and Corn Buttercup
(details from interpretation panels)
Above: Corn Buttercup and Wild Pansy (whole panels)
Right: Wild Pansy, Weaslesnout and Cornflower
(details from interpretation panels)
All images from
Rare and Endangered Cornfield Flowers
at Ryedale Folk Museum

by Amanda Willoughby (Copyright 2002)




THE NATIONAL TRUST IN THE PEAK DISTRICT
Amanda wrote and designed interpretation panels and posters about the nature conservation and countryside management work of the National Trust in the Peak District. Panels include The Ashop Head Path Project, which explains how NT wardens restored the badly-eroded footpath at Ashop Head on Kinder Scout, and More Women Are Wanted, which encourages women to take part in countryside conservation work. The work was displayed in the National Trust Mobile Information Unit which toured NT properties, country shows and town and city centres in and around the Peak District.

Above: National Trust Countryside Conservation panel
Right: National Trust Longshaw Estate Guided Walk poster detail
All by Amanda Willoughby (Copyright 1994)